New sounds I can hear really well

F

  • Which cycle the washer or dryer are on – from the living room
  • Beep when the washer finishes
  • MANY crickets and other chipers outside at night – just opening the door a crack is like turning them all on, they are LOUD
  • Toilet paper crinkling
  • Bed sheets and blankets rustling (not a fan of this sound, I usually take the CI off as soon as I get into bed)
  • The cats meowing – Baxter meowed at me 3 or 4 times before I realized I was hearing him and not Don making meowing noises to bother him
  • People talking over a TV or music turned on in the background
  • The dishwasher water swishing – I used to LOVE our dishwasher because it seemed silent to me… now I can hear it quite well
  • Rain falling lightly when I’m outside or heavily when I am inside
  • Dishes clacking – this still makes me dizzy and I will remove the magnet if I’m putting dishes away

We had a gathering at our house of about 10 people on Wednesday night and I still wasn’t hearing everyone perfectly but definitely doing better than I would have in the past.  Two of our guests were from Belgium and I could understand the the girl fine despite her accent, but the guy had a very deep and quiet voice would sounded like mumrmers mixed with high frequencies.  It was good practice.

Another list is for things that I’m not hearing as distinctly (anoyingly) as at first

  • The car road noise is now something I can tune out
  • My keyboard clacking at work doesn’t drive me as crazy
  • Plastic bags that made me cringe now are kind of a fun sound to play with
  • The birds don’t seem nearly as bothersome as they did originally

Then again, maybe I just need a new map 🙂

Overall – much much better now after almost 3 months than at first.  I’m happy.

7 Comments

  1. Steve
    Jul 31, 2009

    “could understand the the girl fine despite her accent” This, I find VERY interesting!

    I’ve noticed a similar effect myself. There are people at work who speak English with quite strong accents (e.g. from Asia or East Europe) and pre-CI, I could hardly understand a word they said, much less lip-read them. Post-CI, they are way, way easier to understand. I guess it indicates that the critical sounds in English and, possibly, other languages are in the high frequencies; the consonants rather than the vowels.

    This was completely unexpected to me.

    I still have trouble with a lot of regional British accents despite being born and bred there!

    • Sara
      Jul 31, 2009

      I’ve found with accents if I know to expect an accent then it’s a lot easier for me to understand them. There was this loud woman one place I worked and I could tell she was very loud but I still couldn’t understand a word she was saying. Finally one morning she said “Good Morning” to me individually and I realized she was British! After that, much easier to understand because my brain was aware of what to look for lipreading.

  2. Daisy
    Aug 1, 2009

    I see a tendency toward the high pitches getting clearer. My loss is strongest in the midrange – voice range. I wonder if I’m a candidate for CI?

  3. Rachel
    Aug 1, 2009

    That’s great, Sara! I’m glad the CI was such a good match for you.

  4. Nabeel
    Aug 1, 2009

    Very interesting stuff! Glad it’s going well for you. I still don’t like the plastic bag noises… blechhhh!

  5. Michelle
    Aug 2, 2009

    I love seeing what’s new on the sound front with you…. Funny how some sounds that we are hearing more clearly for the first time might bother one of us but not the other and vice versa.

    I don’t know what it is about a British accent but I’ve always found it much easier to lipread/understand than many of the southern men I’ve grown up around who tend to mumble and not ennuciate so much. It’s such a distinct accent… I think I picked it up from my mom’s soaps when I was a kid because I didn’t have much experience speaking to anyone British before college. 😛 One year I worked at a summer camp and could easily lipread (no hearing aids) my friend from England when we were swimming when I couldn’t understand anyone else! The Australian kids I worked with were another story… I never could understand Fiona or Richard, but I sure adored them anyway and they put up with me looking at them cluelessly all summer. 🙂

    Are you getting any major static sounds when around computers and air conditioning (or any major electrical?)

  6. Mog
    Aug 4, 2009

    Hi Sara
    I so understand what you mean about accents. I moved to Canada 3 years ago and have had to learn to lipread in Canadian, which means not only the accent but the phrasing and words. I find it hard. At college there were two tutors, one Nigerian and the other Sri Lankan, who the Canadians found hard to follow, I found them easier than some Canadian accents though as they were accents I was used to hearing plus they spoke British English rather than Canadian.

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